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Razorbacks recall campus memories in film to premiere Thursday night


Fayetteville film recalls 150 years of Razorback traditions

‘If This Walk Could Talk’ premieres Thursday night as part of the school’s 150th anniversary.

If This Walk Could Talk, a local documentary capsulizing the 150-year history of the University of Arkansas, premieres Thursday night on campus. University of Arkansas journalism professor and Emmy-winning filmmaker Larry Foley spent the last two years producing the piece. “We’ve got a lot of great traditions on our campus, none more hallowed than senior walk,” Foley said. “All names of all graduates are on this walk, and every name has a story. So we really focused our 90-minute film on those stories that are connected to senior walk.”He said hundreds of old Razorback yearbooks were a key part of his inspiration for the storyline. “In every one of those yearbooks are really cool old snapshots frozen in time, and some great writing – some prose, some poems, students’ thoughts of their time on campus,” Foley said. “Whether it happened in 1899, or whether it happened in 1929, or whether it happened in 1974. And so that really became the thread of the entire piece. The film premieres 7 p.m. Feb. 10, in the Faulkner Performing Arts Center. It will also be simulcast through the university’s YouTube channel for a virtual audience. After the screening, the film will be available for viewing free on the university’s YouTube page.

If This Walk Could Talk, a local documentary capsulizing the 150-year history of the University of Arkansas, premieres Thursday night on campus.

University of Arkansas journalism professor and Emmy-winning filmmaker Larry Foley spent the last two years producing the piece.

“We’ve got a lot of great traditions on our campus, none more hallowed than senior walk,” Foley said. “All names of all graduates are on this walk, and every name has a story. So we really focused our 90-minute film on those stories that are connected to senior walk.”

He said hundreds of old Razorback yearbooks were a key part of his inspiration for the storyline.

“In every one of those yearbooks are really cool old snapshots frozen in time, and some great writing – some prose, some poems, students’ thoughts of their time on campus,” Foley said. “Whether it happened in 1899, or whether it happened in 1929, or whether it happened in 1974. And so that really became the thread of the entire piece.

These are reflections on time throughout our campus.

The film premieres 7 p.m. Feb. 10, in the Faulkner Performing Arts Center. It will also be simulcast through the university’s YouTube channel for a virtual audience. After the screening, the film will be available for viewing free on the university’s YouTube page.



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