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Oklahoma ballot won’t have question about recreational marijuana



Oklahomans will have to wait to vote on recreational marijuana. The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Wednesday that it will not be on your November ballot. The Yes On 820 campaign had been hoping the state Supreme Court would side in their favor and put marijuana on the ballot in November, but that’s not going to happen.It wasn’t all bad news, however. The state Supreme Court said in its 9-0 ruling that the petitioners simply ran out of time.The campaign and director Michelle Tilley said they ran out of time because it took the state too long to certify their signatures. They also blame recent challenges.The good news for them is that the court also denied those challenges and in doing so, ensured that a vote to legalize recreational marijuana will go to the people, not in November, but at some point.Tilley said they preferred November because they believe a bigger turnout gives them a better chance to win, but she said they also just want this voted on as soon as possible because they believe it’s better for Oklahoma.So, if not November, then when? That will be up to Gov. Kevin Stitt.The campaign wants him to call for a special election as soon as early next year, but he could also do nothing. If that’s the case, Tilley told KOCO 5 it would be another two years, November 2024, before Oklahomans would see this on the ballot.

Oklahomans will have to wait to vote on recreational marijuana.

The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Wednesday that it will not be on your November ballot. The Yes On 820 campaign had been hoping the state Supreme Court would side in their favor and put marijuana on the ballot in November, but that’s not going to happen.

It wasn’t all bad news, however. The state Supreme Court said in its 9-0 ruling that the petitioners simply ran out of time.

The campaign and director Michelle Tilley said they ran out of time because it took the state too long to certify their signatures. They also blame recent challenges.

The good news for them is that the court also denied those challenges and in doing so, ensured that a vote to legalize recreational marijuana will go to the people, not in November, but at some point.

Tilley said they preferred November because they believe a bigger turnout gives them a better chance to win, but she said they also just want this voted on as soon as possible because they believe it’s better for Oklahoma.

So, if not November, then when? That will be up to Gov. Kevin Stitt.

The campaign wants him to call for a special election as soon as early next year, but he could also do nothing. If that’s the case, Tilley told KOCO 5 it would be another two years, November 2024, before Oklahomans would see this on the ballot.



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